Feeding the algae with tax money: EUTRO-farming and EU-trophication



Posted on 03 July 2007  | 
Report - Feeding the algae with tax money: EUTRO-farming and EU-trophication
Feeding the algae with tax money: EUTRO-farming and EU-trophication
© WWFEnlarge

The Baltic Sea is the largest brackishwater sea in the world. It is also the youngest sea on the planet which makes it one of the world’s most unique ecosystems. Over the past 100 years however the Baltic Sea has changed from a clear-water ecosystem to a eutrophic – nutrient rich – marine environment.

The main reason for this is the release of large amounts of nutrients, mainly nitrogen and phosphorus, into its waters. Most of these come from agriculture in the region, but also from traffic, industry, waste-water, and shipping. Each year an estimated one million tonnes of nitrogen and 35,000 tons of phosphorus are deposited in the Baltic Sea.

Underneath, immense damage is taking place. A staggering 70 000 km2 of the Baltic sea-beds are dead marine wastelands because of dead algae which sink to the sea-floor where they decompose and consume the oxygen needed by other marine organisms. As a result fish, marine mammals and other living organisms find it difficult to breed and even to survive.

Download the brochure to learn more about the impacts and causes of eutrophication.

Report - Feeding the algae with tax money: EUTRO-farming and EU-trophication
Feeding the algae with tax money: EUTRO-farming and EU-trophication
© WWF Enlarge

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